fearinthewind
stickmarionette:

chaila:

helenhasnomiddlename:

(Includes some spoilers)
On Mako and Stacker’s relationship
In the beginning when Mako is introduced to Raleigh, she says “Imeji to chigau,” to Stacker, meaning “(he) is different than I thought.” When I heard her say this, I thought it was weird for her to use such informal language towards her superior. If she were actually talking to her superior, she would have said “Imeji to chigaimasu," which would be a more formal way of saying so. I thought it was a minor slip-up with the script, as not many writers look too much into the culture basics of foreign languages when writing dialogue (although towards Raleigh, she speaks formally). Later on we find out that she is actually his adoptive daughter, and I realized why she used such informal language. Although in English, she may speak to Stacker in a way of talking to her superior, in Japanese, her mother tongue, she uses an informal, friendly way of talking to Stacker, her father figure. 

I love that the movie paid attention to this. I loved the little ways it became clear that he, as her adoptive dad, didn’t force her out of her native language or culture, but instead tried to adopt some of it with her, in a respectful way. He speaks Japanese with her—does she speak Japanese to anyone in this movie besides him, apart from the response to Raleigh?—he bows in greeting, etc. She’s speaking English with him when updating him as her superior about the candidate trials, but when she starts to get angry and beg for the chance he promised her, she switches to Japanese. When he’s telling her “More control” during the fight, he does it in Japanese but he calls her “Miss Mori” like a superior would. It’s this really great mix of informal family intimacy and the formality of their now professional relationship, and it shows a lot of mutual respect. These little moments revealed the closeness of their relationship, the way their family bond is intertwined with the formal rank structure, the way they’ve built a solid family of two, in really subtle ways. 
It is little things like this that surprised me in a thoroughly pleasant way about the movie, and are why I really liked it a lot. I like that the movie took *time* to pay attention to these things, took time to give us little moments whose implications mean a lot for the characters, amidst the dinosaur-punching. 

Frankly it’s a miracle that any Hollywood production paid this much attention to a foreign culture/language. Love it.

stickmarionette:

chaila:

helenhasnomiddlename:

(Includes some spoilers)

On Mako and Stacker’s relationship

In the beginning when Mako is introduced to Raleigh, she says “Imeji to chigau,” to Stacker, meaning “(he) is different than I thought.” When I heard her say this, I thought it was weird for her to use such informal language towards her superior. If she were actually talking to her superior, she would have said “Imeji to chigaimasu," which would be a more formal way of saying so. I thought it was a minor slip-up with the script, as not many writers look too much into the culture basics of foreign languages when writing dialogue (although towards Raleigh, she speaks formally). Later on we find out that she is actually his adoptive daughter, and I realized why she used such informal language. Although in English, she may speak to Stacker in a way of talking to her superior, in Japanese, her mother tongue, she uses an informal, friendly way of talking to Stacker, her father figure. 

I love that the movie paid attention to this. I loved the little ways it became clear that he, as her adoptive dad, didn’t force her out of her native language or culture, but instead tried to adopt some of it with her, in a respectful way. He speaks Japanese with her—does she speak Japanese to anyone in this movie besides him, apart from the response to Raleigh?—he bows in greeting, etc. She’s speaking English with him when updating him as her superior about the candidate trials, but when she starts to get angry and beg for the chance he promised her, she switches to Japanese. When he’s telling her “More control” during the fight, he does it in Japanese but he calls her “Miss Mori” like a superior would. It’s this really great mix of informal family intimacy and the formality of their now professional relationship, and it shows a lot of mutual respect. These little moments revealed the closeness of their relationship, the way their family bond is intertwined with the formal rank structure, the way they’ve built a solid family of two, in really subtle ways. 

It is little things like this that surprised me in a thoroughly pleasant way about the movie, and are why I really liked it a lot. I like that the movie took *time* to pay attention to these things, took time to give us little moments whose implications mean a lot for the characters, amidst the dinosaur-punching. 

Frankly it’s a miracle that any Hollywood production paid this much attention to a foreign culture/language. Love it.

drsdarklady

tamorapierce:

gohomeluhan:

As I’m walking through Target with my little sister, the kid somehow manages to convince me to take a trip down the doll aisle. I know the type - brands that preach diversity through displays of nine different variations of white and maybe a black girl if you’re lucky enough. What I instead found as soon as I turned into the aisle were these two boxes.

The girl on the left is Shola, an Afghani girl from Kabul with war-torn eyes. Her biography on the inside flap tells us that “her country has been at war since before she was born”, and all she has left of her family is her older sister. They’re part of a circus, the one source of light in their lives, and they read the Qur’an. She wears a hijab.

The girl on the right is Nahji, a ten-year-old Indian girl from Assam, where “young girls are forced to work and get married at a very early age”. Nahji is smart, admirable, extremely studious. She teaches her fellow girls to believe in themselves. In the left side of her nose, as tradition mandates, she has a piercing. On her right hand is a henna tattoo.

As a Pakistani girl growing up in post-9/11 America, this is so important to me. The closest thing we had to these back in my day were “customizable” American Girl dolls, who were very strictly white or black. My eyes are green, my hair was black, and my skin is brown, and I couldn’t find my reflection in any of those girls. Yet I settled, just like I settled for the terrorist jokes boys would throw at me, like I settled for the butchered pronunciations of names of mine and my friends’ countries. I settled for a white doll, who at least had my eyes if nothing else, and I named her Rabeea and loved her. But I still couldn’t completely connect to her.

My little sister, who had been the one to push me down the aisle in the first place, stopped to stare with me at the girls. And then the words, “Maybe they can be my American Girls,” slipped out of her mouth. This young girl, barely represented in today’s society, finally found a doll that looks like her, that wears the weird headscarf that her grandma does and still manages to look beautiful.

I turned the dolls’ boxes around and snapped a picture of the back of Nahji’s. There are more that I didn’t see in the store; a Belarusian, an Ethiopian, a Brazilian, a Laotian, a Native American, a Mexican. And more.

These are Hearts 4 Hearts dolls, and while they haven’t yet reached all parts of the world (I think they have yet to come out with an East Asian girl), they need all the support they can get so we can have a beautiful doll for every beautiful young girl, so we can give them what our generation never had.

Please don’t let this die. If you know a young girl, get her one. I know I’m buying Shola and Nahji for my little sister’s next birthday, because she needs a doll with beautiful brown skin like hers, a doll who wears a hijab like our older sister, a doll who wears real henna, not the blue shit white girls get at the beach.

The Hearts 4 Hearts girls are so important. Don’t overlook them. Don’t underestimate them. These can be the future if we let them.

You can read more about the dolls here: http://www.playmatestoys.com/brands/hearts-for-hearts-girls

This is the most amazing thing!  Little sisters heck!  Have you got nieces, granddaughters, cousins, daughters?  Not only girls of color can benefit by having dolls like these, but white girls who are growing up in a world of color!

freyadt

lohelim:

winterthirst:

sabacc:

Steve Rogers did, in fact, realize that something was off when he saw the outline of the woman’s odd bra (a push-up bra, he would later learn), but being an officer and a gentleman, he said that it was the game that gave the future away.

 (via)

No, see, this scene is just amazing. The costume department deserves so many kudos for this, it’s unreal, especially given the fact that they pulled off Peggy pretty much flawlessly.

1) Her hair is completely wrong for the 40’s. No professional/working woman  would have her hair loose like that. Since they’re trying to pass this off as a military hospital, Steve would know that she would at least have her hair carefully pulled back, if maybe not in the elaborate coiffures that would have been popular.

2) Her tie? Too wide, too long. That’s a man’s tie, not a woman’s. They did, however, get the knot correct as far as I can see - that looks like a Windsor.

3) That. Bra. There is so much clashing between that bra and what Steve would expect (remember, he worked with a bunch of women for a long time) that it has to be intentional. She’s wearing a foam cup, which would have been unheard of back then. It’s also an exceptionally old or ill-fitting bra - why else can you see the tops of the cups? No woman would have been caught dead with misbehaving lingerie like that back then, and the soft satin cups of 40’s lingerie made it nearly impossible anyway. Her breasts are also sitting at a much lower angle than would be acceptable in the 40’s.

Look at his eyes. He knows by the time he gets to her hair that something is very, very wrong.

cloakedfiguresandtheangels

dutchster:

deluxetoaster:

sonsofsauron:

deluxetoaster:

where did this website’s sudden obsession with skeletons come from

From inside ourselves.

fcugn no first of alll;, you do not come into my house with your bullshit skeleton puns do u wanna fucking fite I could take like 5 shitty skeltons don’t test me

wow that really got under your skin, how do you not find skeleton puns humerus